Barcelona eye Hertha Berlin teen star

first_img Loading… Promoted ContentTop 10 Most Populated Cities In The World10 Hyper-Realistic 3D Street Art By Odeith8 Superfoods For Growing Hair Back And Stimulating Its GrowthThe Best Geek Movies Of All Time11 Most Immersive Game To Play On Your Table Top18 Cities With Neverending Tourist-Flow27 Breathtakingly Beautiful Albino AnimalsBest Car Manufacturers In The WorldWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?Couples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable Way10 Risky Jobs Some Women Do7 Universities In The World Where Education Costs Too Much Read Also: Bereaved Osimhen arrives Lagos Hertha are not likely to be in a position to consider any offers until their Bundesliga safety is assured in the coming weeks. However, Labbadia could be tempted to sell, if the club receive an acceptable offer, with Samardzic’s contract not due to expire until 2024. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 center_img Barcelona are monitoring Hertha Berlin’s promising winger Lazar Samardzic, after the 18-year old made his Bundesliga debut last weekend. La Blaugrana have reportedly scouted the German U19 international in action for Hertha’s youth teams this season, according to Mundo Deportivo. Samardzic’s brief performance in their 4-0 Berlin derby win over rivals Union Berlin offered a glimpse of a player rumoured to be attracting interest from across Europe. Serie A side AC Milan were linked with an offer in the January transfer market, alongside Atletico Madrid and Juventus. The versatile forward has created waves in German youth football in 2019-20, with 14 goals in 16 appearances persuading Bruno Labbadia to bring him into the first team fold in early 2020.Advertisementlast_img read more

ICC World Cup AB de Villiers reacts to comeback row, says ‘important to support team at World Cup’

first_imgNew Delhi: Former star South African cricketer AB de Villiers on Friday said that all that was important was to support the Proteas at the ICC Cricket World Cup 2019, apparently reacting to the row over team management’s decision to reject his offer to come out of retirement to play for the team in the tournament.“All that’s important is that we should all focus on supporting the team at the World Cup. There is a long way to go and I believe the boys can still go all the way,” de Villiers wrote on Twitter.The reaction from AB de Villiers came a days after South African convenor of selectors Linda Zondi revealed that he had made a last minute comeback offer but it was rejected by the team management on moral grounds.AB de Villiers, who retired from International cricket in May last year, had approached South African skipper Faf du Plesis, head coach Ottis Gibson and Zondi 24 hours before the announcement of squad for the World Cup.”The decision was based on principle; we had to be fair to the team, the selection panel, our franchise system and players,” Zondi said. Zondi further added that he had requested AB de Villiers not to retire in 2018 and gave him the option to choose his own matches but he turned down the offer then.Zondi said he didn’t have any option to consider AB de Villiers’ offer as the squad had been finalised and confirmed and selecting him in the team would have been injustice to the other players who performed well in his absence.“At no point in the year that he had retired did he make himself available for selection. It was no option when I received the news on the day of the squad announcement, our squad was finalised and confirmed. AB is undoubtedly one of the best players in the world, but above all else, we have to stay true to our morals and principles, there is no regret in the decision,” he said.In the absence of AB de Villiers, the South African team had a disastrous start to the tournament and lost first three of their matches, including the one against underdog Bangladesh. Already in shambles, the team suffered another blow after their pace attack spearhead Dale Steyn ruled out of the tournament due to a shoulder injury. For all the Latest Sports News News, ICC World Cup News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps.last_img read more

Quality of Life, Culture Attracts Advertising Firm to RB

first_imgBy John BurtonThe Sawtooth Group partners are, from left, Jay Quilty, Kristi Bridges and Bill Schmermund.RED BANK — The Sawtooth Group has found a new home in the borough where employees’ creative work can flourish and their quality of life has improved.Sawtooth, an advertising and marketing firm, relocated in June from Woodbridge, N.J. to about 20,000 square feet of space at 141 West Front St. in Red Bank.The move, the company’s partners said recently, made sense for them, given the work they do. “It’s important for us to be downtown,” said Jay Quilty, one of the partners.There is vitality, an energy that comes from being part of a downtown community, as opposed to simply working out of an office park, he said.“It’s a real difference,” between their former offices and Red Bank, said Quilty, who commutes from Bucks County, Pa. “You don’t walk in the suburbs.”Sawtooth employees had been working in two connecting offices in Woodbridge. The sprawling township with 100,000 residents has a mix of industrial, commercial and retail complexes, along with residential communities and is intersected by a number of major roadways.While Quilty and his partners, Kristi Bridges and Bill Schmermund, realize the Middlesex County location offered a centralized destination for employees and clients, it lacked amenities they wanted, such as a vibrant cultural scene in town and the natural light that was missing in their old offices, Bridges said.The former site “didn’t do anything for us,” said Bridges, who is the firm’s creative director.When the partners searched for a location to combine operations from the two separate spaces in Woodbridge, they knew they needed to meet their needs on both professional and personal levels.That led them to Red Bank and the fit has been successful.“People are really into Red Bank,” Quilty said, as Sawtooth Group’s approximately 70 employees can explore the culture and entertainment avenues the community provides.They have found that also has helped stoke the creative process, which is at the heart of what the Sawtooth Group does.“Building brands and making them irresistible to the customers” is what the company does, said Quilty, who heads up client services for the firm.“We try and tell a truth” about a product they have been charged with creating an image for or rebranding, he said.That is done, in part, by “connecting as an emotional image,” said Schmermund, Sawtooth’s chief executive officer.“The brand and the customer kind of mirror each other” when they are successful, Bridges said.The company’s challenge for one of its current bigger clients, McCormick’s herbs and spices, is how to reintroduce what is really a venerable product to a new generation or to re-engage former customers.“There is no one size fits all” approach to their business, Quilty noted, as the firm looks at an increasingly segmented media landscape — TV, radio, print, social media — to come up with the strategy that would best work for their clients’ goals.“We have message strategies to meet all of those segments,” Quilty said.“What’s the secret stuff?” he asked. “It starts with meeting with the clients. What’s fun and challenging is where these messages are going to show up.”Advertising, like many other industries in a time of rapidly changing technology, is “in a state of flux now,” Quilty acknowledged. But, he said, the core components remain the same. “You start with a business problem and a challenge … and you use creativity to make them fall in love with the product.“I find that interesting,” he said.That’s what keeps Quilty and his partners in the game.“It’s a great way to make a living,” said Bridges, a Rumson resident, who has spent her career in advertising. “It’s not easy. It can be very hard but I love it.”It’s all about keeping it interesting — whether it is the work, the location where the work is done or even the company’s name. Started by Schmermund, who lives in Holmdel, about 24 years ago, Sawtooth Group was named after a mountain range in Idaho. “We wanted a conversation starter,” he said.“Sometimes names are something that have a feel,” Quilty said.last_img read more

Starting 2016 on the Right Foot

first_imgBy Gretchen C. Van Benthuysen | While some people were sleeping late or nursing hangovers the morning after New Year’s Eve, others were welcoming 2016 by taking a brisk walk in nature.Out on the northern tip of Sandy Hook, about 200 people gathered for the American Littoral Society’s annual beach walk, led by Executive Director Tim Dillingham.The annual New Year’s Day Greenway Walk took hikers through the Ramanessin section ofHolmdel Park. Photo: Courtesy Marissa FinkFurther inland, 17 people met on in the Ramanessin section of Holmdel Park for a journey along a 2.1 mile trail. The annual New Year’s Day Greenway Walk, sponsored by the Friends of Holmdel Open Space, was led by Holmdel’s former mayor and former Environmental Commission chairman, Larry Fink.Both men said while having fun was important, getting people outside to enjoy and appreciate the environment is important to their respective groups’ missions.The American Littoral Society, a national nonprofit organization based in Sandy Hook, promotes the study and conservation of marine life and habitats along the coast. Dillingham has led the annual walk for 13 years.“We’ve found the best way to help people learn about and understand the coastline is to get them out here so they develop a passion for it,” Dillingham said. “We love to be on the beach.”But life on the coast is getting more complicated.“We are trying to help fashion a better relationship with how we live along the ocean. People have been living in New York and New Jersey for 400 years and they’re not likely to leave anytime soon,” Dillingham explained. “Now the change in climate, ecologically, is causing the ocean to change so it’s becoming hazardous. We need to help people to know how to live here.”Part of the ecological coastline balancing act is preserving wetlands and salt marshes, rebuilding sand dunes and oyster reefs, and not building walls that cause waves to carve away the ocean’s bottom, Dillingham said. Those measures also are very important to the survival of marine life that live in those areas, he added.But on a chilly and windy January 1st morning, foremost on the minds of beach walkers was simply keeping warm and hoping the sun would break through gray clouds — which it did around noon.Cleo Boiko of Allenhurst said she enjoyed her first New Year’s Day beach walk with the American Littoral Society.“It was very very invigorating,” said Boiko, a member of the Monmouth County Senior Hikers group. “One of the other ladies and myself picked up a bag full of garbage so I felt I did something good for the environment and something good for myself.”Siobhan Quinn, Richard Irish and their baby Aoife. Photo: G. Van BenthuysenSiobhan Quinn, Richard Irish and their baby Aoife were enjoying refreshments at the Littoral Society’s headquarters at 18 Hartshorne Drive following the walk. Quinn said this was her fifth time walking, although she only walked part of the way since Aoife, who turns 1 in February, was getting cold. Raised in Leonardo, she said her parents taught her and her four siblings how to swim in the Atlantic Ocean and Raritan Bay.“We’d have picnics here at Sandy Hook, walk the beach, watch the sun set and the moon rise,” she said. “It’s a place that should be cherished, preserved, respected, appreciated and acknowledged. And this is a perfect day to do that. We so often don’t take the time to be in awe of how beautiful our surroundings are.”The Ramanessin section of Holmdel Park is another beautiful area people may miss as they drive by in their cars, said Larry Fink. The New Year’s Day walk began 21 years ago, he said, after a 416-acre area was purchased with $19 million in public and private money to preserve it from being used for a housing development.“The area was divided in two parts with over 200 acres becoming the Ramanessin section of Holmdel Park and managed by the county,” Fink explained. “It’s a conservation and wilderness area that’s been kept as natural as possible with a gravel parking lot and gravel and dirt trails.”Maps of the trails are available online at monmouthcountyparks.com and in the parking lot on Roberts Road. Fink strongly suggests first timers use one.People interested in learning more about land use in Holmdel may contact Citizens for Informed Land Use at www.holmdel-CILU.org.To learn more about the American Littoral Society, upcoming events, or to receive its newsletter should call 732-291-0055 or visit www.littoralsociety.org.last_img read more

Fair Haven Cop Recovering After Swimming Accident

first_imgBy Jay Cook |BELFORD – By all accounts, Dwayne Reevey is the kind of cop any police department would be lucky to have.He’s in the schools creating relationships with the youth, allows the kids in town to call him by his first name and has been known to play pickup basketball after school while still in uniform.That’s exactly why the greater Fair Haven community has rallied to support Reevey, 32, who grew up in town, during his recovery from a tragic July 4 swimming accident that left him with a broken neck.“Deep down, I was scared,” Reevey told The Two River Times from his Belford home this week. “For a second I thought I was going to die.”He and his family were celebrating Independence Day on Long Beach Island; they had a condominium there and were on the beaches all day. It was 5:30 p.m. and Reevey headed to the ocean after a sandy game of frisbee. He might have jumped into the water about 15 times that day, but this time he didn’t realize the tide had receded.Reevey, who stands at 6 feet 4 inches, jumped into a breaking wave in water that only reached his shins.“Immediately my eyes opened and I could see the water and sand,” he recalled. “My ears were ringing like that scene on the beach in ‘Saving Private Ryan.’ That’s when my fingers went numb. I kept telling myself, ‘get up, get up, get up.’ ”After a few moments of lying in the surf, Reevey mustered up the strength to stand and walk out of the ocean. He alerted his wife, Christina, that something wasn’t right. A first aid squad arrived in short order and Reevey was at Southern Ocean Medical Center in Manahawkin in under an hour.Thinking he only suffered a stinger or a muscular injury, Reevey was blindsided when a physician’s assistant informed him of the serious prognosis.He had fractured his C1 vertebrae in four places. He said every doctor told him he should be either paralyzed or dead. But remarkably, he wasn’t.“God gave me another chance,” Reevey said. “I definitely had angels looking after me that day.”Surgery soon followed. He was transferred to Jersey Shore University Medical Center, Neptune, and was admitted for seven days. Doctors installed a halo, a device where four screws are drilled into the first layer of the skull and connected to support beams for stabilization. Reevey was then moved to Riverview Medical Center in Red Bank to undergo five days of rehabilitation.Nearly two weeks after that life-altering leap, Reevey is back in the comfort of his own home with his wife, mother and 1-year-old son, albeit with some changes. His vigorous workout routine has come to a standstill as he can’t lift more than five pounds, meaning he can’t even pick up his son. Sleeping isn’t easy either, but Reevey has begun to find a groove. Soon after returning home July 16, Reevey started taking walks, brewed coffee and cooked his own eggs. He knows he’s lucky to be alive.“Now I just have a new perspective on life and how short it really is,” he said.Efforts to support the Reevey family after the accident quickly blossomed. He’s a Fair Haven native with roots dating back to the 1880s in the borough. A graduate of Rumson-Fair Haven Regional High School, he went on to major in criminal justice at Rowan University, where he played soccer and basketball. Reevey joined the Fair Haven Police Department in 2010 as a 26-year-old and quickly became a friendly presence for the police in the local school district.Reevey’s closest friends dating back to his middle school days set up a GoFundMe account to provide financial help to his family. Remarkably, in only six days, 676 people donated $71,781 to help pay for the impending hospital bills.“It was one thing to just ‘like’ the post,” said his wife, Christina, “but for people to actually put themselves out there and do that was amazing.”Seventh-grade students from Knollwood School held a bake sale July 12 to fundraise for Dwayne Reevey, who teaches the Law Enforcement Against Drugs (LEAD) program to students in Fair Haven’s public schools. Photo by Jay CookHis impact on school-aged children is evident. Three young girls set up a lemonade stand fundraiser July 9 at the corner of River Road and Lexington Avenue. Later in the week, eight seventh-grade girls from Knollwood School held a homemade bake sale outside the ACME on River Road to raise money for his recovery.“We had him in fifth grade and we felt really bad because he’s one of our favorite police officers in town,” said 12-year-old Reilly Sullivan. “We just really wanted to do something.”Reevey said he’s been touched by all the personal sentiments and support from his small hometown.“I don’t know what to do to show all of my appreciation and gratitude,” he said. “I just feel like screaming to everybody about how happy I am and how much of an impact their support had on my mentality.”That mentality has kept Reevey focused on an eventual return to work. He’ll wear the halo for two months and, with no setbacks in his rehab, he hopes to return to light duty in mid-September.“He’s like a brother to us,” said Fair Haven police chief Joseph McGovern. “I’m pretty optimistic that he’s going to have a full recovery. It may take some time but he’s making progress.”That sense of normalcy will be welcomed with open arms, Reevey said. He’s eager to get back in the schools, protect the community and also fully recover to be there for his family.“I don’t know what they would do if I didn’t get out of the ocean that day,” Reevey said about his wife, son and mother. “Yeah, it’s scary, but it just means that I have to live my life to the fullest and keep doing what I’m doing.”This article was first published in the July 19-26, 2018 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more