SUU Men’s Basketball Visits Idaho State Thursday

first_imgJanuary 7, 2020 /Sports News – Local SUU Men’s Basketball Visits Idaho State Thursday Tags: Idaho State basketball/SUU Basketball Written by FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPOCATELLO, Idaho-Thursday evening, Southern Utah men’s basketball (9-5, 2-1 in Big Sky Conference play) visits Reed Gym to battle the Idaho State Bengals (5-7, 2-1 in Big Sky).In his fourth season at SUU, head coach Todd Simon (45-68, .398) has the Thunderbirds in third place in the Big Sky after a 59-53 win over Montana State Saturday at the America First Event Center.SUU scores 74.8 points per game, which ranks the Thunderbirds 112th in scoring offense.Junior guard John Knight III (13.1 points per game) leads SUU in scoring and is tied for a team-best 32 assists with redshirt senior guard/forward Cameron Oluyitan (12.6 points, 5.1 rebounds per game).Redshirt senior forward Dwayne Morgan (11 points per game) also scores in double figures on-average for the Thunderbirds this season.Sophomore guard Harrison Butler leads the squad in rebounds (7.9 per game) and is tied for the team lead in blocked shots with sophomore forward Maizen Fausett (11 blocked shots per contest).The Thunderbirds out-rebound opponents 40.1-31.7 per game as their +8.4 rebound margin per game ranks them 17th nationally.SUU surrenders 63.9 points per game, ranking the Thunderbirds 67th nationally in scoring defense.The Bengals are coached by first-year head coach Ryan Looney (5-7, .417) and are coming off of a 68-49 loss to Sacramento State last Saturday.Idaho State scores 68.5 points per game as the Bengals are tied for 253rd nationally in scoring offense with UNLV.Junior guard Tarik Cool leads Idaho State in scoring (14.6 points per game), steals (15) and assists (43).Senior forward, Australian national Chier Maker (12.2 points, 5.3 rebounds per game) and senior guard Jared Stutzman (10.2 points per game) also score in double figures on-average for the Bengals.Senior forward Chidi Udengwu leads Idaho State in rebounding (5.9 boards per game) and junior forward Malik Porter has a team-best 11 blocked shots for the Bengals.The Thunderbirds lead the Bengals 19-12 all-time and have won four of their last five games against Idaho State in the series. Brad Jameslast_img read more

Leading NE estate agent signs up to OTM after originally rejecting its overtures

first_imgA leading 27-branch independent estate agent in the North East is to begin listing its properties via OnTheMarket.Pattinson says it has signed up to the portal after originally deciding not to join its ranks when the then mutual platform launched in January 2015.The estate agency says it has reversed this decision after coming to the conclusion that listing with OnTheMarket is “in the best interests of our clients”.Pattinson was launched in 1977 by Keith Pattinson and still operates out of its original head office in Newcastle-upon-Tyne, expanding since then to employ 200 people.It has branches in several additional key regional housing markets including in Sunderland, Alnwick, Morpeth, Consett and Whitley Bay and its current MD is Keith’s daughter, Caroline.OnTheMarket says it has signed a long-term agreement with the estate agency and that Pattinson has agreed to “promote the OnTheMarket.com portal brand with digital and branch-based marketing activity”.In June OTM said it had millions of unallocated shares ready to distribute to agents who signed up to longer deals.Pattinson also lists with Rightmove and Zoopla but also operates a significant and eponymous auction business.“We did not join OnTheMarket.com in its early days but have watched closely and we have been impressed by the momentum building,” says Caroline Pattinson (left).“The fact that the portal is agent backed also attracts us; the property market moves best when agents co-operate.“We have had great success working with other estate agents in auctions and working with an agent backed portal makes complete sense to us.”Ian Springett, Chief Executive Officer of OnTheMarket plc, says: “As a fiercely independent firm with a strong customer service ethos, Pattinson has achieved an enviable market share and reputation in the North East and the firm will undoubtedly strengthen our position in the area with its property listings and positive support for our proposition.”  ian Spingett OnTheMarket OTM Pattinson Caroline Pattinson estate agent September 21, 2018Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021 Home » News » Agencies & People » Leading NE estate agent signs up to OTM after originally rejecting its overtures previous nextAgencies & PeopleLeading NE estate agent signs up to OTM after originally rejecting its overtures27-branch Pattinson has signed a long-term deal with the portal three years after it originally decided not to list with it.Nigel Lewis21st September 20180980 Viewslast_img read more

St Peter’s divided over ball ‘freak show’ plans

first_imgThe possibility of booking a ‘freak show’ for the St Peter’s Ball has caused consternation among the College’s students.The ball committee is divided over whether the entertainment of the so-called ‘Circus of Horrors’, which features acts including a dwarf known as ‘Demon Dan’, and ‘Mongolian Laughing Boy’, who receives shocks in an electric chair, would be appropriate for the event.A number of students at St Peter’s were shocked to hear about the plans, and one branded them “morally questionable”. The ball committee were quick to deny that the performance was a freak show, despite being described on the company website as “The stupendous Carnival of the Bizarre with Doctor Haze and his Freak Show”.Stephen Dunne, one of the ball committee presidents, emphasised that the act was as yet unconfirmed and said, “They are a professional unit, for whom the members choose to work.” He conceded that “you could argue against the ethics of the act”, but that the members “do not ‘humiliate’ themselves during the show”.Some of the acts have been seen as too “gruesome or macabre” to be featured. Roger Sibley, a representative of Carters Entertainment Limited, who help put on the shows, told Cherwell that dwarf Demon Dan’s talents include “stapling playing cards to his face” and “pulling a hoover around with a part of his body that’s not his hands”.He commented, “That’s one for the adult audience”. Natalie Fox, St Peter’s other ball president, said that the committee were free to choose who would perform. She explained, “We’ve decided against some of the worst ones, like this guy who can put kebab skewers through his cheeks.”Fox admitted that, “Some people are unsure about whether they would want to watch it”.Tegan McLeod, an English student at St Peter’s, said, “For me the idea seems voyeuristic and exploitative. It’s exhibiting human oddities for a profit.“Though some may argue it’s a performance art, I think it’s really hard to deny that this type of show is a form of social discrimination.”Nonetheless, the committee currently intend to go ahead and book the Dr Haze’s group for the ball. Dunne defended the decision, saying the College would only book “people who do not self harm or who would not cause any lasting emotional damage to the audience. “They provide a massive spectacle, a great talking point, and are something that will make the St Peter’s Ball truly different to all other balls.”last_img read more

Indiana Arts Commission And Arts Council To Host Creative Town Hall Today At …

first_img  Who We Are    What We Do    Celebration of Leadership    VOICENews    Calendar of Events    Get Involved Remember–IGNITE THE NITE is less than a month away! Click here or call us for tickets and sponsorships! Golfers and non-gofers welcome! You’re invited to an arts-focused town hall discussion next week hosted by the Indiana Arts Commission and the Arts Council! The Creative Indiana Town Hall is 4:30-6:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 12 at the Sauced ballroom.The evening begins with a presentation from Ghanaian immigrant, musician and teacher Theophilus (Theo) Akai who will share his experience as a musician in southwestern Indiana and what it’s been like to introduce his community to global cultures through art. Then Evansville’s Leadership Everyone CEO Lynn Miller Pease will lead participants in a high-energy town hall-style conversation about how we can grow the arts in our communities, regions and statewide.What: Creative Indiana Town HallWhen: 4:30-6:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 12Where: The Ballroom at Sauced, 1113 Parrett St. Evansville, IN 47713For more information, contact the Arts Council at 812-303-3178 COME AND CELEBRATE EVANSVILLE’S LATINO CELEBRATION IN THE HEART OF THE CITY. The 6th Annual FIESTA EVANSVILLE is set to bring wonderful entertainment for the whole family! Live Music Bands, Mariachi, Inflatables, Kids Carnival Games with more than 100 Booths sharing fun, culture, and delicious Ethnic Food from 20 Different Latin American Countries!!! Come and enjoy the Awesome Parade of Nations and the Entertainment of Wonderful Latin Artists! October 13, 11 am, Wesselman Park, FREE! Join the Vanderburgh County Health Department for their FOURTH Neighborhood Baby Shower on Sunday, October 13, 2-4 pm at the CK Newsome Center. Call 812-435-5813 to register or click here! Free lunch and prizes, and you must sign up to attend–space is limited to the first 100 registrants. Questions?Email [email protected] or call 812-425-3828 x3. Questions?Email [email protected] or call 812-425-3828 x3. COME AND CELEBRATE EVANSVILLE’S LATINO CELEBRATION IN THE HEART OF THE CITY. The 6th Annual FIESTA EVANSVILLE is set to bring wonderful entertainment for the whole family! Live Music Bands, Mariachi, Inflatables, Kids Carnival Games with more than 100 Booths sharing fun, culture, and delicious Ethnic Food from 20 Different Latin American Countries!!! Come and enjoy the Awesome Parade of Nations and the Entertainment of Wonderful Latin Artists! October 13, 11 am, Wesselman Park, FREE! Remember–IGNITE THE NITE is less than a month away! Click here or call us for tickets and sponsorships! Golfers and non-gofers welcome! FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare You’re invited to an arts-focused town hall discussion next week hosted by the Indiana Arts Commission and the Arts Council! The Creative Indiana Town Hall is 4:30-6:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 12 at the Sauced ballroom.The evening begins with a presentation from Ghanaian immigrant, musician and teacher Theophilus (Theo) Akai who will share his experience as a musician in southwestern Indiana and what it’s been like to introduce his community to global cultures through art. Then Evansville’s Leadership Everyone CEO Lynn Miller Pease will lead participants in a high-energy town hall-style conversation about how we can grow the arts in our communities, regions and statewide.What: Creative Indiana Town HallWhen: 4:30-6:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 12Where: The Ballroom at Sauced, 1113 Parrett St. Evansville, IN 47713For more information, contact the Arts Council at 812-303-3178  Who We Are    What We Do    Celebration of Leadership    VOICENews    Calendar of Events    Get Involved Join the Vanderburgh County Health Department for their FOURTH Neighborhood Baby Shower on Sunday, October 13, 2-4 pm at the CK Newsome Center. Call 812-435-5813 to register or click here! Free lunch and prizes, and you must sign up to attend–space is limited to the first 100 registrants. Indiana Arts Commission and Arts Councilto host Creative Town Hall Tod At Haynie’sCorner TOMORROW: Indiana Arts Commission and Arts Councilto host Creative Town Halllast_img read more

Greggs ‘controlling costs’

first_imgRetaiL baker Greggs complained of rising energy costs as it reported flat like-for-like sales performance over the Christmas trading period, in a statement last week.Group MD Sir Michael Darrington said the group’s like-for-like sales in the second half, the 28 weeks to December 31, 2005, increased by 3%. Under-lying like-for-like sales growth was around 2%, after adjusting for the benefit of extra trading days over the Christmas period compared with 2004. Like-for-like sales over the Christmas and New Year period, the five weeks to January 7, were up by 5.4%. However, comparisons are distorted as there were additional trading days. Underlying like-for-like sales progress during this period was negligible, said Greggs.Despite substantial cost pressures during the year, notably in energy, it had made some progress in controlling costs in what is undoubtedly a more challenging trading environment, Sir Michael said. Greggs expects to report modest progress, in line with market expectations, in its preliminary results on March 10, he added. During 2005, Greggs opened 72 new shops and closed 16, giving a total of 1,319 outlets trading as Greggs and Bakers Oven as of December 31. This was ahead of target.last_img read more

Rademaker focuses on craft style

first_imgThe Rademaker Crusto bread line has been specially developed for large craft and industrial breadmakers to create artisan breads.Crusto’s cutting tools shape the bread without harming the structure, says the company. The Crusto’s ’cut bread’ technology allows bakers to work with strongly hydrated doughs, such as ciabatta for instance, and also with bulk-fermented doughs, to achieve a high-quality completely artisan look and structure.For products that need to be decorated with seeds, top and/or bottom, Rademaker has developed a special method. A continuous dough sheet runs over and/or under a moisturising roller, which makes the dough wet. This enables a universal strewer to deposit the seeds on top while a conveyor transfers them to the bottom. Any excess seeds fall down between the topping module and are recycled.The Crusto can make different size rolls, various shaped loaves and, for rounded products, there is the option of a fully integrated rounder. If required, a special calibrating module can de-gas the dough sheet for toast-style breads. The weighing module ensures very accurate weights, even with difficult doughs, says the company. Rademaker offers 24-hour service helpdesks plus nationwide engineering and technical help, controlled in the UK by its Bolton office.[http://www.rademaker.com]last_img read more

Moderna: vaccine is 94.5% effective

first_img Google+ Facebook Google+ Facebook Moderna: vaccine is 94.5% effective Twitter Pinterest WhatsApp (Photo supplied/Moderna) The Moderna vaccine is 94.5% effective against coronavirus, according to early data released Monday by the company.Moderna heard its results on a call Sunday afternoon with members of the Data Safety and Monitoring Board, an independent panel analyzing Moderna’s clinical trial data.Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, also a former executive at Eli Lilly, told ABC’s “Good Morning America” that Monday is a historic day.“It’s been 10 months since this virus hit our shore and we’ve got a second 90% plus vaccine for the American people,” said Azar. “We hope to have enough by the end of December to vaccinate 20 million of our most vulnerable citizens.”Last Monday, executives at Pfizer said their coronavirus vaccine is proving more than 90% effective in late-stage clinical trials. One of the scientists who helped create Pfizer’s vaccine says it could return the world to normal life by next winter. Azar has a rough sketch of who would get the vaccine first.“We’re going to follow the guidance of the CDC and they’ll look at senior citizens in nursing homes, healthcare workers, etc. It will be wherever it’s going to add the most value according to the data, the science, and the recommendations of our experts,” said Azar.Azar said states will have the “funding that’s needed” but some of the states are operating under a “misconception.”“They don’t actually touch the vaccine. This all goes through private distribution channels, goes to the CVS’, Walgreens, pharmacies, health centers, hospitals. We’re having a call with our governors later this afternoon (Monday) and the Vice President. We’ll get them whatever they need. We’re going to make sure this is a good distribution process for these historic vaccines,” said Azar.Azar added that the government would be willing to work with President-elect Joe Biden when it’s “appropriate,” but said that as of now the General Services Administration hasn’t certified Biden as the winner of the election.He also said having vaccines with a 90% effectiveness is almost unheard of.“In public health, we do not get a vaccine with 90% effectiveness often, but here we have two of them with that kind of efficacy and clean safety protocols,” said Azar.In Indiana, more than 4,600 Hoosiers have died from coronavirus. By Network Indiana – November 16, 2020 0 306 Twitter CoronavirusIndianaLocalMichiganNationalNews WhatsApp Pinterest Previous articleStructure fire closes part of Old U.S. 20 in Elkhart MondayNext articleShipshewana closes Town Hall to public through the end of the year Network Indianalast_img read more

What’s behind the housing market challenges in Indiana

first_img (Source: http://www.aag.com/ Terms: https://goo.gl/t0dOs4) The housing market is experiencing a shortage of houses along with higher demand from buyers with the pandemic playing a role.Yet, there has been a shift in the last year, said Greg Cooper, real estate broker for the Cooper Group in an interview with Inside Indiana Business.“What we have gone from is a fear of COVID, why people weren’t putting their homes on the market, to a true fear of oh my goodness, where am I going to go, my home’s going to sell in an hour and a half,” said Cooper. He said the conditions aren’t that different in markets around the state. “It’s really this way if you’re in Jeffersonville, South Bend, or wherever.”A recent report from F.C. Tucker Co. showed inventory in Central Indiana plummeted by 61.1% in March, compared to the same period a year ago, with home prices increasing 10.6%. Every county in the region saw home inventory decreases of 23.3 percent or higher, and 12 of the 16 counties had inventory decreases of 62.5% or higher.“A random township in central Indiana three years ago on April 1 might have had 200 homes for sale. Today they have 48. Basically, you have 100 people trying to buy 25 homes right now in most places in the state of Indiana,” said Cooper.Cooper urges you not to get discouraged if you’re a buyer.“Keep at it. Because if you can buy a home within the next few months to the latter part of the summer, a year from now we’re going to see the same thing and you’ll have put equity in your pocket. So be patient,” said Cooper.If you’re a seller, you’re facing a different kind of challenge. Cooper says it’s imperative that you get the details of the sale right.“You must understand how to structure the appraisal. You must understand all of the things that give you leverage. It’s best to put everything in a proper equation that gives you the most leverage and the safest path to a closing. It’s not as easy as it sounds,” said Cooper. Google+ By Network Indiana – April 14, 2021 1 166 Facebook Twitter IndianaLocalNews Facebook Google+ Twitter Pinterest WhatsApp Previous articleUPDATE: Silver Alert has issued for missing Warsaw man cancelledNext articleSt. Joseph County Council extends county-wide mask mandate Network Indiana Pinterest What’s behind the housing market challenges in Indiana WhatsApplast_img read more

Twiddle & Aqueous Trade Sit-Ins, Crowd Surf, And Play “Ghostbusters” In Buffalo [Watch]

first_imgTwiddle and Aqueous brought their jam wares out to Buffalo, NY last night, playing the first of a two night weekend run at the Town Ballroom. The sold out crowd was eager to catch both bands last night, with Aqueous coming out of the gate with a strong opening set before Twiddle closed it down with two big sets of their own. Both bands collaborated with each other and dug deep to create priceless concert memories that won’t soon be forgotten.Aqueous opened the night, coming out strong with their song “Strange Times.” The real highlight of their set came in the middle of their song “Numbers & Facts,” when the band welcomed out Twiddle bassist Zdenek Gubb to accompany them on their debut performance of “Express Yourself.” The N.W.A song saw Aqueous’s Evan McPhaden rapping through the bars before crowd surfing while Gubb held it down on the low end. What a wild time!Check out full video of the show below, broken into three parts by TheKamherst. Setlist: Aqueous | Town Ballroom | Buffalo, NY | 3/4/17Set: Strange Times, Second Sight, Numbers & Facts > Express Yourself* > Numbers & Facts, Don’t Do It* = NWA cover, Zdenek Gubb from twiddle on bass, Evan McPhaden on MC dutiesSetlist: Twiddle | Town Ballroom | Buffalo, NY | 3/4/17Set One: Blunderbuss, Polluted Beauty, White Light, Brick Of Barley, Carter CandlestickSet Two: Wildfire, Indigo Trigger, Dr. Remedies, Latin Tang*, Lost In The ColdEncore: Ghostbusters Theme*** = with Mike Gantzer** = with Mike Gantzer & Evan McPhaden[Photo by Tim Merrill] Twiddle hit the stage thereafter, bringing two five song sets to keep the energy high throughout the whole night. The group really found their groove in a great version of “White Light” in the first set, and kept up the jamming through the whole show. They welcomed Aqueous’s Mike Gantzer out during “Latin Tang” in the second set, and would also surprise fans with a “Ghostbusters Theme” encore to close out the night. “Ghostbusters” also featured Gantzer and McFadden from Aqueous, as the additional musicians added some energy to the stage.Check out videos of “Latin Tang” and “Ghostbusters” below, courtesy of TheKamherst.last_img read more

In shared run, a sort of stand

first_imgAs Massachusetts and the nation remember the tragic events at last year’s Boston Marathon, Harvard runners are getting ready to move ahead the best way they know: together.A group of chilly but eager marathoners gathered Friday in front of the John Harvard Statue for a 2-mile jog into Boston to pick up their official numbers.“I’m a little nervous, but excited,” said junior Jennifer Shi, a first-timer competing to help raise money for the American Medical Athletic Association.Three weeks ago, Daniel Lieberman, a professor in human evolutionary biology, met Provost Alan M. Garber for their last long training run in preparation for the 26.2-mile race. The pair attacked Heartbreak Hill, a rolling section of the course that has long challenged even the most elite athletes.“The way to heal this wound is to run it harder and faster and better than ever this year and not be deterred,” said Lieberman, who often runs alone during the week but connects with members of the Harvard community for longer training runs on weekends. “It doesn’t mean you don’t pretend it didn’t happen. That’s not only impossible, it’s unimaginable. So to be very mindful of it, thoughtful of it, emotional about it, but to overcome it.“The marathon always is a celebration of the human body and the human spirit and perseverance and endurance,” he added. “The very idea of the marathon is about enduring. It’s about overcoming challenge.”In preparing for the race, many runners relied on groups such as Harvard on the Move, which sponsors regular runs and walks for staff, students, and faculty, and the Harvard College Marathon Challenge (HCMC), an email listserv that connects athletes for training runs and helps raise money for various charities.Many Harvard runners who took part in last year’s race said they were returning this year as a way both to honor those who died or were injured and to show support for the city of Boston. Then there are those who were ushered off the course last year, and are coming back to make that triumphant turn onto Boylston Street for the last dash across the giant yellow “finish” spelled on the pavement.Todd Lubin ’15 had secured a number though HCMC and was running to support Phillips Brooks House. The first 16 miles were “absolutely amazing,” he recalled, but then some nagging injuries started to flare up. Lubin pressed on and was less than a mile from the finish when a wall of runners standing on the course stopped him cold.“Nobody had any idea what was going on except that something happened at the finish.”Lubin grabbed a cab back to Cambridge, where he had dinner with his family and a running partner and tried to make sense of the day’s events. In the weeks that followed, one thing became clear: He was going to run again. Like the thousands of marathoners who didn’t finish last year’s race, Lubin was invited by organizers to return.“I absolutely wanted to run again, it was not a question. When it all settled, I felt very lucky to be given another chance to run again to show support for Boston.”Garber recalled the festive mood a year ago as he headed off to the starting line on a bus packed with student athletes.“We rode the bus to Hopkinton in high spirits. Many of the students were running their first marathon and there was such an air of excitement. As I crossed the finish line, I thought it was one of the most wonderful marathons I’d run, with perfect conditions and the runners and spectators in a great mood. But it wasn’t long before everything changed.”Lieberman, who crossed the finish line 50 minutes before the attack, soon connected with Garber. They heard the bombs as they walked with their families through the Public Garden, but assumed they were cannon blasts in honor of Patriot’s Day. When they arrived in Harvard Square, they learned what had happened.“My phone just went berserk,” said Lieberman, “and that was the end of my runner’s high.”But in the hours and days that followed, the Harvard community joined people from all over the world in responding in inspiring ways. Garber recalled the students, staff, and alumni who helped close to 1,400 soon-to-be freshmen arriving for Visitas, an introduction to the Harvard experience, make alternate plans with the campus locked down amid the search for the suspected bombers. Days later, students in Cabot House filled in for dining hall employees so they could attend the funeral service for 29-year-old bombing victim Krystle Campbell, the daughter of a co-worker.“We’re often focused on day-to day concerns — our work, our studies, our everyday frustrations and triumphs,” said Garber. “There are very positive events that bring us together as a community, like Commencement. But sometimes a disaster pulls us together. Although it is terrible in so many ways, it really brings out the true colors of the Harvard community.”Garber, who was certain last year’s marathon would be his last, had no doubt about running one more time. “It really was going to be my last marathon. But after the bombing, like so many other people, I thought it was important to send a message by showing up this year.”He said is looking forward to another bus ride with students out to the starting line. “I know that being with them will give me a huge boost.”Shi has been part of the HCMC listserv since her freshman year. A member of the track team in high school, she turned to long-distance running at Harvard to help her cope with the stress of final exams. Connecting with fellow runners on the listserv motivates her to run, “even when I don’t want to.”She expects an emotional day and a grueling test. And to complete the course, no matter how long it takes.“I will just be happy if I finish.”One Harvard runner’s finish last year was a show of exceptional bravery, and was honored as such on Friday. Serving as a guide for a blind runner, Everett Spain, an Army colonel and doctoral student at Harvard Business School, was 100 yards from the finish line when the bombs went off. Spain led his charge across the line and then rushed to help the wounded. He was awarded the Soldier’s Medal in a ceremony on Friday at HBS, the highest award for an act of valor in a noncombat situation.last_img read more