Longsilent diverse voices speak loudly at Toronto film fest

first_img Login/Register With: Advertisement Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment “And it is never on screen and it is certainly never associated with Africa. If we see Africa at all, it is always used as a backdrop: a big blob of a continent rather than a specific street or a country or a place.”Nair premiered her upcoming Disney film Queen of Katwe, about a chess prodigy who rose from the slums of Uganda, at the Toronto International Film Festival over the weekend. But she was far from the only filmmaker at the festival focused on capturing lives and faces that have had to fight for their place on the big screen.A rich crop of racially diverse films is poised to disrupt two straight years of overwhelmingly white Academy Awards. But there’s a larger groundswell at work. A range of filmmakers ‘have taken it upon themselves to create these stories,’ says David Oyelowo.Living partly in the Ugandan capital of Kampala where she runs a film school, the Indian-born filmmaker Mira Nair is regularly surrounded by lives she rarely sees reflected back by the movies.“The dignity of everyday life — the beauty of it, the attitude of it — is what I live around,” says Nair. Facebook Advertisement Twitterlast_img read more